Bed Bug Eggs

Bedbug DatabaseThe transmission of bed bug eggs is also an issue. It is not uncommon for the live bedbugs amongst an infestation to be completely eradicated during an effective treatment cycle only to have the remaining or surviving eggs hatch and re infest the location. The bed bug eggs themselves are usually unaffected by and/or not killed by most approved pesticides. The eggs can also have an incubation period of up to several weeks and may be deposited in hidden areas that are difficult to penetrate, difficult to find, or simply hidden away from what otherwise would have been a quick lethal treatment (i.e. lethal treatment such as the killing of a bed bug's eggs through heat—by hot ironing fabric surfaces where bed bugs have hidden, through steaming [typically using a fabric steamer], via direct machine drying, or through a procedural use of boiling water, etc.).

Bedbug DatabaseThis stubborn tendency of bed bug infestations towards re-emergence can be incredibly problematic and made all the more difficult to detect due to a now smaller size of the newly re-emerged bed bug nymphs. Re infestation can also be made more difficult to discover early enough due to a corresponding decrease in the 'size' of infestation symptoms—such as fewer and now much smaller fecal droppings that may be scattered in between and more difficult to detect (droppings that may then be found resembling lone, tiny pinhead-sized dabs from a black permanent-marker). As well as other 'smaller' infestation symptoms such newer sloughed off skins that tinier in size and the potential for hiding locations that are more narrow and thus harder to find during re infestation, etc. The result of a recurrent bed bug infestation can prove dispiriting, disheartening, demoralizing, and even depressing to households that may have already gone great lengths (in expense, labor, treatment, containment measures, lost furniture, etc.) to try and contain an infestation. Fortunately, more effective (as well as cost-effective) approaches towards successful treatment can come with experience.

Bed bug Eggs General machine washing and drying on high heat will disinfect most clothing of potential bed bugs and will kill their eggs as well. In the 18th century, turpentine was used in combination with henna (Lawsonia inermis, aka camphire) flowers and alcohol, as an insecticide that also reputedly killed bed bug eggs. The use of a fabric steamer on the infestations will kill the eggs and the bugs instantly. The bed bugs cannot handle the intense heat and are killed in a couple of seconds. Since steam will penetrate the pores of a mattress, it can reach deep into the corners of beds.

Adult bed bugs, the nymphs, or their eggs may also follow home movers into their new homesite infesting the new location as well—often following movers who were, in fact, moving out due to an unmanaged infestation.

An immature bed bug may take several months to mature to an adult and an adult bed bug can live for up to one year. During development, the young bed bug will feed frequently on the blood of humans, and can exist for many months between blood meals. Bed bugs inject saliva into the blood stream of their host to thin the blood, and to prevent coagulation. It is this saliva that causes the intense itching and welts. The delay in the onset of itching gives the feeding bed bug time to escape into cracks and crevices. In some cases, the itchy bites can develop into painful welts that last sever

Bedbug EggsYet another perceived cause of the bed bug resurgence is the growing push to recycle mattresses. Not only are mattresses to be recycled, collected, and stored with those already processed, but it is very difficult to ensure that no bed bugs or eggs survive the processing. In the 18th century, turpentine was used in combination with henna (Lawsonia inermis, aka camphire) flowers and alcohol, as an insecticide that also reputedly killed bed bug eggs. Use of steam or by spraying rubbing alcohol on any visible insects is done to effectively rid bed frames of adult bed bugs and eggs, although it does not serve as a permanent treatment.

Bed bug EggsBedbugs show strong resistance to dessication, able to survive low humidity and a 35–40°C range even with loss of one-third of body weight; earlier life stages are more susceptible to drying out than later ones. The thermal death point for the common bedbug (C. lectularius) is high: 45 °C (113 °F), and all stages of life are killed by 7 minutes of exposure to 46 °C (115 °F). However, in heating buildings, to ensure that no bedbugs survive in cooler locations, the US Department of Defense recommends using a temperature of at least 49 °C (120 °F), at 20-30% relative humidity, for at least 20 minutes.

The use of a fabric steamer on the infestations will kill the eggs and the bugs instantly.[citation needed] Since steam will penetrate the pores of a mattress, it can reach deep into the corners of beds.[citation needed] Individual items can be treated with heat. Oven-like devices have been designed specifically for this purpose and are available on the market.[citation needed] Clothing can be sanitized by a 120 °F (49 °C) laundry dryer.

Enclosing a mattress in a black plastic bag and placing it in the sun on a hot day is not considered effective, because temperatures won't necessarily be high enough everywhere.

Bed Bug DatabaseBed bugs are parasites that feed on the blood of people and certain animals, and they require these blood meals to grow and reproduce. They live close to areas where people typically sleep, rest, or sit for long periods. Hungry bugs will move out from their hiding places, in search of exposed skin. You may also find cast skins, which are empty shells of bugs as they grow from one stage to the next. After a blood meal, bed bugs deposit fecal spots (composed of digested blood) in areas adjacent to the feeding site or back at their hiding places.

Getting rid of bed bugs has been a problem documented as early as medieval times in Europe or during the time of Aristotle in Greece. Often attacking when one is fast asleep, bed bugs are smart creatures that choose to move when the target least knows it. Every person will have his own version of a bed bug. The bed bugs will die if they come into contact with the chemicals, but considering their size, it is likely that a few will survive. If one of the survivors is a female -- able to produce hundreds of eggs in here lifespan -- then a newborn tribe of pests will be sucking blood from their sleeping victims in at least one day following conception

 

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